Central Bank of St. Louis

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  • Your wallet-friendly guide to wedding gift-giving

    Wedding season is in full force, which means your wallets might be feeling a little… empty. When it comes to gift-giving you have three main options: shop their registry, give a handmade or personal gift, or take the cash route.

    wedding gifts decorated with roses and bows

    How to determine what to spend
    It can be hard to determine how much cash is the right amount to spend. Knot.com suggests never spending less than $50 [1]. Really no amount is wrong; however, here are the ranges to keep in mind when determining the amount of cash to give or spend on a gift:


    • Family Member or Friend: $50 - $75
    • Close Family Member or Close Friend: $50 - $100
    • Acquaintance or Coworker: $50
    • Wedding Party: If you're in the wedding party, you should probably be on the higher end of the scale, while also considering the amount you may have already spent on wedding attire and event preparation. If you went on an extravagant bachelorette/bachelor festivity or purchased a high-dollar bridesmaid dress, use this to determine how much you can afford to spend on a gift.

    It's important to note that if you're mailing a card, it's always best to send a check in the rare instance that your card gets lost or stolen!

    an infographic covering the gift range from a close family member to a coworker

    Exceptions to the rule
    There are some obvious exceptions to these rules. Don't give more than you can afford. If you're in college or even unemployed, you were invited because the couple would love for you to be there (with or without a gift).

    If you were asked to help on special projects - such as invitations or wedding planning - where you spent a lot of your time helping the bride or groom, you may not feel the need to give as much. If you've given other contributions, you should feel a sense of pride and give yourself a pat on the back because the couple trusts you and your dependability.

    Give a group gift
    If you're wanting to give a gift as a group, it can be fun to choose a larger gift from the registry and split the cost among friends. The larger gifts on the registry will most likely be overlooked by single-family gift givers.

    The rules of gift-giving are not black and white. There is no “right or wrong” amount to give. Use these guidelines and trust your gut. You can never put a dollar amount on a friendship, so don't overthink it and give what you can.

    [1] The Knot, 5 Rules of Wedding Gift Giving



  • The information provided in these articles is intended for informational purposes only. It is not to be construed as the opinion of Central Bancompany, Inc., and/or its affiliates and does not imply endorsement or support of any of the mentioned information, products, services, or providers. All information presented is without any representation, guaranty, or warranty regarding the accuracy, relevance, or completeness of the information.